Search

Research

Journal: Nature Genetics 2008 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print]
Title: ADAMTSL2 mutations in geleophysic dysplasia demonstrate a role for ADAMTS-like proteins in TGF-beta bioavailability regulation.
Authors: Le Goff C et al.
Affiliation: Département de Génétique, Unité INSERM U781, Université Paris Descartes, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, 75015 Paris, France.

Abstract Excerpt: Geleophysic dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, thick skin and cardiac valvular anomalies … we observed a significant increase in total and active TGF-beta in the culture medium as well as nuclear localization of phosphorylated SMAD2 in fibroblasts from individuals with geleophysic dysplasia. These data suggest that ADAMTSL2 mutations may lead to a dysregulation of TGF-beta signaling and may be the underlying mechanism of geleophysic dysplasia.

Free online

Journal: Pediatrics. 2005 Sep;116(3):771-83. (Correction published in Pediatrics. 2005 Dec;116(6):1615.)
Title: Health supervision for children with achondroplasia.
Authors: Trotter TL, Hall JG; American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Genetics.

Abstract: Achondroplasia is the most common condition associated with disproportionate short stature. Substantial information is available concerning the natural history and anticipatory health supervision needs in children with this dwarfing disorder. Most children with achondroplasia have delayed motor milestones, problems with persistent or recurrent middle-ear dysfunction, and bowing of the lower legs. Less often, infants and children may have serious health consequences related to hydrocephalus, craniocervical junction compression, upper-airway obstruction, or thoracolumbar kyphosis. Anticipatory care should be directed at identifying children who are at high risk and intervening to prevent serious sequelae. This report is designed to help the pediatrician care for children with achondroplasia and their families.

This article is free and available online.  Click here to access the PDF.